Welcome

Welcome!

Welcome to the website of the Vegetarian Society of Richmond, Virginia!  We are here to support you in pursuing a healthy, compassionate, earth-friendly vegetarian lifestyle.  Whether you are a committed vegan or just trying out a few vegetarian dishes, you are welcome here!  See our events page for a list of upcoming events.  We hope to see you soon!

Solar Power Made Simple and Affordable

Just in time for summer, the sun is shining more brightly on Richmond. 

The Richmond Region Energy Alliance (RREA) recently launched its new solar power bulk purchasing program, SolarizeRVA.   SolarizeRVA seeks to expand solar energy in Richmond by making it affordable through economies of scale, standardized pricing, and streamlined financing.  The program – and special pricing – will end on July 15th.

Bulk purchasing, an idea similar to wholesale and buying in bulk at stores like Costco, allows Richmond homeowners to save money on the price of solar by contracting for installations as a group, driving down the overall cost of installations.  Participants can expect to pay 10-15% less than current market rates for their systems.

In addition to the bulk discount, people can apply the 30% federal tax credit and long-term financing to make investing in solar power practical and approachable.

Two companies were selected to participate in the program - Integrated Power Sources of Virginia and Altenergy, - as they represented the best intersection between price, product, and experience.  By pre-qualifying the contractors, SolarizeRVA further streamlines the process for homeowners, as the vetting has already been done for them.

When a homeowner is interested in going solar, SolarizeRVA’s installers will conduct a satellite site assessment to determine if the roof is good for solar—looking for trees and other obstructions.  From there, a free home assessment is conducted to determine how large or small of a system is needed to provide power for the home.  People can learn more and sign up for the program at www.SolarizeRVA.org.


New Resource Coming For Richmond Area Vegans!

This new website will be a one-stop resource for vegans, including local events, recipes, clothing options, local restaurant listings, and more.  Stay tuned for the launching of this website.

Study Show Diabetes Less Prevalent in Vegetarians

Vegetarians are less likely to have diabetes, compared with nonvegetarians, according to a new study from Taiwan. Among 4,384 Buddhists, the women and men who avoided all meat products were approximately 33 and 50 percent less likely to have diabetes, respectively. The lead author notes that the omnivorous participants consumed a predominantly plant-based diet with little meat and fish, suggesting that even modest animal consumption can increase the risk for diabetes. Other population studies have also found that as animal product intake increases, so does risk for diabetes. In addition, the vegetarian group had higher intakes of fiber, folate, vegetables, and whole grains and lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol.

Chiu THT, Huang HY, Chiu YF, et al. Taiwanese vegetarians and omnivores: dietary composition, prevalence of diabetes and IFG. PLOS One. Published online February 11, 2014.

Fiber Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

High-fiber diets help reduce your risk of colorectal cancer, according to a review published this month in the Gastroenterology.

Researchers identified 20 studies which analyzed fiber intake and risk of colorectal polyps, precursors to colorectal cancer. Sources of fiber included vegetables, fruits, and grains. Those who consumed the most fiber had a 28 percent lower likelihood of developing colon polyps, compared with those who consumed the least fiber.

Additionally, every 10 grams of dietary fiber cut the likelihood of having a polyp by 9 percent. This review stresses the importance of knowing risk factors for cancer and the best practices for prevention.

Ben Q, Sun Y, Chai R, Qian A, Xu B, Yuan Y. Dietary fiber intake reduces risk of colorectal adenoma: a meta-analysis. Gastroenterology. 2014;146:689-699.